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 Post subject: Newbie - West London
Post Number:#1  PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 12:04 am 
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Joined: 11 January 2013
Posts: 2
Location: London
Hello, I am a mum of 3, our eldest boy is nearly 9 and has Asperger's. We live in West London and are currently homeschooling, which, pending a Tribunal result could become permanent.

We are looking for other AS families in the area and for other homeschoolers in particular. Also curious to know if anyone else has been through a Tribunal situation. Looking forward to making some friends here!


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - West London
Post Number:#2  PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 9:27 am 
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Joined: 13 January 2013
Posts: 4
Location: essex
Hi - I also have a son age 11 who at present is being home tutored via the children support service. This is only a temporary measure and I am now seriously thinking of home schooling. Would be great if we could swap some ideas? advice?


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - West London
Post Number:#3  PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:05 pm 
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Joined: 11 January 2013
Posts: 2
Location: London
Yay, friends!

I think the approach to educating at home depends on how your child seems to like working. Some like a very structured routine, literally like school at home, with a set timetable and planned activities, others prefer to learn as they go along through life! The beauty of it all is that you are not welded to the National Curriculum like schools although you are advised to give a broad education and the National Curiculum gives a good guideline to follow as you choose.

Our boy has never really understood the point of school and loathes the formality of it. Our approach is somewhere in between the two extremes. We do an hour on, an hour off right up until 3pm when I need collect other children from school.

I semi plan our working time depending on what things I would like him to learn. He did not make much progress at school so we are working at his own level to give him confidence and introduce new things slowly. His reading is good but his maths is not so great and I am focusing on that. We are currently working on telling the time, money and number place values. He reads to me daily. On his hour off he may go on the computer to play games or look up stuff or he will play with Lego or do origami.

Sometimes we are led by his interests, some days I feel he needs a break from "work" and we might play a board game, do a jigsaw, bake or explore an educational app relating to his interests - dinosaurs and animals. There are some fabulous apps and websites, great educational games, good TV shows to be watched through the day (documentaries etc.) and much to learned just from day to day living - cooking (weighing and measuring), shopping (handling money, budgeting) travelling (how to use timetables, public transport).

We have been home educating for half a term now and I plan to visit a local-ish group next week. It is a little like a play group and there are short classes/talks held too. We will see how we both feel about that and I hope that he will enjoy it, even if he just plays the whole time,he will be around a mixture of children or all ages.

While we came to home educate not entirely through choice, we are really enjoying it - he is so much more relaxed and therefore open to learning - completely different from his time at school!


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 Post subject: Re: Newbie - West London
Post Number:#4  PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2013 9:12 am 
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Joined: 29 February 2008
Posts: 203
Location: The central office
Octsmum wrote:
I think the approach to educating at home depends on how your child seems to like working. Some like a very structured routine, literally like school at home, with a set timetable and planned activities, others prefer to learn as they go along through life! The beauty of it all is that you are not welded to the National Curriculum like schools although you are advised to give a broad education and the National Curiculum gives a good guideline to follow as you choose.


Home education is intended to be child centred where the styles and methods used are those which individual children are happiest and most comfortable with. The NC can be used as a guideline and is somewhat helpful if you child proposes to take exams but most HE families do not rigidly follow it.

Quote:
Sometimes we are led by his interests, some days I feel he needs a break from "work" and we might play a board game, do a jigsaw, bake or explore an educational app relating to his interests - dinosaurs and animals. There are some fabulous apps and websites, great educational games, good TV shows to be watched through the day (documentaries etc.) and much to learned just from day to day living - cooking (weighing and measuring), shopping (handling money, budgeting) travelling (how to use timetables, public transport).


The way the human brain works is that one learns most effectively when they are naturally interested in the subject. Children can learn vast amounts of useful knowledge - including in English, maths, science, history etc. - through day to day living. Casual learning is very underrated nowadays. I am planning on writing an article to promote it.


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